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Proposition 65

Availability of Hazard Identification Materials for Bisphenol A for the July 15, 2009 Developmental and Reproductive Toxicant Identification Committee Meeting
[05/01/09]

This document posted on May 4, 2009 (at 2:53 pm) replaces the document of the same name posted on May 1, 2009 (at 4:45pm). Non-substantive typographical errors in the previous version are corrected in this document.

Download the document Assessment of the Evidence of Developmental and Reproductive Toxicity of Bisphenol A here. (updated 10/14/09)

The California Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) is the lead agency for the implementation of the Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986 (Proposition 65).  The Developmental and Reproductive Toxicant Identification Committee (DARTIC) of OEHHA’s Science Advisory Board advises and assists OEHHA in compiling the list of chemicals known to the State to cause reproductive toxicity as required by Health and Safety Code Section 25249.8.  The Committee serves as the State’s qualified experts for determining whether a chemical has been clearly shown through scientifically valid testing according to generally accepted principles to cause reproductive toxicity.

The DARTIC will consider the listing of bisphenol A at its next meeting on Wednesday, July 15, 2009.  The meeting will be held in the Auditorium of the Elihu Harris State Building, 1515 Clay Street, Oakland, California.  The meeting will begin at 10:00 a.m. and will last until all business is conducted or until 5:00 p.m.  The agenda for the meeting will be published in advance of the meeting.

On January 18, 2008, OEHHA requested information relevant to the assessment of the evidence of developmental and reproductive toxicity for bisphenol A.  The initial 60-day data call-in period was extended an additional 60 days and closed on April 17, 2008.  OEHHA staff evaluated the significant volume of information that was received.  OEHHA has completed the hazard identification materials for bisphenol A and announces the availability of the document entitled: “Evidence on the Developmental and Reproductive Toxicity of Bisphenol A.” *  The DARTIC will use these documents at its July 15 meeting to consider whether bisphenol A should be added to the Proposition 65 list as a chemical known to cause reproductive toxicity.

This notice marks the beginning of a 60-day public comment period.  Copies of the document are available on OEHHA’s web site below, or may be requested by calling (916) 445-6900. 

In order to be considered by the DARTIC Members, written comments must be received at OEHHA by 5:00 p.m. on Tuesday, June 30, 2009. Hard-copy comments may be delivered in person or by courier to:

the Proposition 65 Office
Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment
Proposition 65 Implementation
P.O. Box 4010
1001 I Street, 19th floor
Sacramento, California 95812-4010
FAX (916) 323-8803
Or via e-mail: sam.delson@oehha.ca.gov

*In addition to that document there are three other reviews:

  1. Monograph on the Potential Human Reproductive and Developmental Effects of Bisphenol A prepared by the National Toxicology Program-Center for the Evaluation of Risks to Human Reproduction (NTP-CERHR, 2008)
  2. European Union Risk Assessment Report on 4,4’‑Isopropylidenediphenol (Bisphenol A), Final Report 2003
  3. Update of the Risk Assessment of 4,4'-Isopropylidenediphenol (Bisphenol A), Final Human Health Draft for Publication (to be read in conjunction with published EU RAR of BPA, 2003), April 2008.

Health and Safety Code section 25249.5 et seq.

 
 
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